i need help reading refrigerator circuits.

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i need help reading refrigerator circuits.

Postby drone » Wed Jan 04, 2012 1:27 am

Hello, I'm new here and hoping someone can help me understand this. I have a good mechanical understanding of the flow of electricity and the components within a circuit, but can't read diagrams well.

Do any components like a run capacitor run off the neutral wire? Because that's what several residential refrigerator circuits I have seen imply. Isn't the neutral side of the circuit the power going out? If that's true how is the run cap feeding power for the start winding?

I was unable to post a pic but if you google image Amana Refrigeration there is a few circuits on there that will illustrate what I'm trying to understand
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Postby drone » Wed Jan 04, 2012 1:45 am

my best guess would be that neutral does feed the power for the run cap...just the power is primarily coming from the opposite direction as the hot wire power is going. i know it's 'alternating current,' but the electron path flow does come from a 'source' or path of least resistance.
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Postby drone » Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:46 am

i'm not a service tech...just enjoy reading mechanics.

so essentially, neutral does feed power 'in' correct?
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Postby heatseeker » Thu Jan 05, 2012 3:09 pm

no no and no. neutral is just that neutral zero charge. Oh don't go sticking your finger in there.
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Postby drone » Thu Jan 05, 2012 7:29 pm

this website is a useless waste of time.

bye losers
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Postby heatseeker » Fri Jan 06, 2012 10:08 am

Just because you don't get the info you want doesn't mean this is a waste of time. You asked a question and it was answered correctly more than once. If you can not understand the basics of electricity than you should not even fool with it. You obviously think you are an engineer because you like to make things more difficult than they have to be. a neutral wire has no voltage unless it is powered by a hot wire thru a load. That is a simple as it gets. You can touch a neutral wire AS LONG AS THE LOAD SIDE IS not ENERGIZED . In other words you have to open the switch to the load than the current will flow thru the neutral wire. Of coarse all that the neutral wire does is complete the circuit. Now if you have a 240 volt motor than both legs will carry 120 volts so that would make a total of 240 however their is no neutral wire on a 240 volt motor. So 120 has a neutral 240 and up is still a single phase motor but does not have a neutral wire instead one wire could be called a common wire still energized with 120 volts. Now if you are dealing with three phase motors you have three hot wires no neutral no common. I hope that clears things up for you. I am not an electrical engineer and I don't try to be, this explanation is just the way I keep it simple so I CAN STAY FOCUSED in the field. There is alot of stuff I don't understand but I don't need to know theory to fix it, sometimes too much knowledge makes things more difficult.
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Postby Freon » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:53 pm

You need to understand what the neutral wire really is. At the pole there's a transformer that converts (steps down) a very high voltage to the residential 240 volts, AC. On the residential side you'll see 3 wires going to the house and into the breaker box. 2 wires are the ends of the transformer secondary coil at the street and the other is the center tap of that coil. The voltage between either transformer end wire and the center tap is 120 volts. The center tap is always zero volts and is the neutral. Since the phase of the voltage is 180 degrees out of phase, between the end wires of the transformer you get 240 volts.

You can hold the neutral and have no worries because it's the center tap of the transformer and usually bonded to the earth ground at the breaker box. However to have a complete circuit you'll need to have the return current flow through the neutral to the center tap of the power transformer secondary.

A capacitor in a psc motor is used to alter the phase of the electric current so there's a torque on the motor armature causing it to spin. Now if it's a 240 volt motor, the neutral is not needed and they will us the 2 transformer end wires, L1 and L2. If it's a 120 volt motor then you'll use L1 and the neutral.
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Postby heatseeker » Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:36 am

thanx freon
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Postby juster » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:12 pm

Thank you Freon, theduke, and heatseeker.
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