double fuse and two voltages

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double fuse and two voltages

Postby carodriguez » Fri Jun 24, 2011 1:46 pm

Hello -

My unit is a carrier tech 2000 that quit working about two weeks ago. It was recharge last year, fan is ok but the condensing unit won't come on at all.
A friend check it all and found two different voltage on the outside fuses. One has 42v ant he other has 120v. We have replace the circuit breaker inside the house panel that look worn out but I'm still without air cond in the 100' Oklahoma weather. HELP
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- double fuse and two voltages

Postby carodriguez » Sat Jun 25, 2011 3:49 am

I have re3place them and also the first thing we replace was the capacitor the unit did came on for 5 secs then turns off. I have check the compressor and it does not have and open circuit. Any ideas?
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- double fuse and two voltages

Postby 4ftBanger » Sat Jun 25, 2011 11:37 am

You really need a qualified electrician to determine the cause of the voltage issue. If the breaker and fuses are OK then you likely have a broken wire or connection between the breaker and the outdoor unit - Poor electrical connections generate heat and are the primary cause of electrical house fires.
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- double fuse and two voltages

Postby nomadpeo » Sun Jun 26, 2011 8:57 am

agree with brother banger. the low voltage could be a sign of a larger problem, possibly in the backplane of your distribution panel. you could have low voltages lurking throughout other circuits in your house. have your panel checked.

your friend who originally checked for proper voltage.....i assume he has a meter. the fuses you are referring to........are they in a disconnect feeding power to the condensing unit ? if so, have him check the line side voltage on that disconnect to verify proper voltage. if the voltage difference is there and you have replaced the breaker feeding it, don't try to run this unit anymore and call the electrician. however, if the line side reads correctly (l1 -l2 * 230, l1-grnd * 115, l2-grnd * 115) and the voltage difference is on the load side of the disconnect (feeding the unit), then the fused disconnect is probably the problem and needs to be replaced. make sure you have a qualified person verify this diagnosis and do the work. it is not your day to die.
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