Pool Heater

Problems related to residential installations.

Pool Heater

Postby poolguy » Sun Jul 03, 2011 4:18 pm

I have a Lochinvar EneryRite2 Pool Heater. At the end of last year, I replaced the Honeywell Smart Gas Valve, replaced a temperature sensor and leaned the heat exchange. The heater would only fire if I jumped out the airflow sensor, but it did ignite, so I closed it up and waited till next year to replace that sensor. Well, now the I have replaced the sensor, it still will not ignite. The LED troubleshoot flashes 3 times which tells me it is an issue with the airflow sensor. Should I just try to jump out the senor again? If so, how do I do this (I think I just disconnect connect the wires going to the sensor and connect them with a jumper wire). The tech did the jumping last year, and I didn't watch that closely. Any suggestions?
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- Pool Heater

Postby nomadpeo » Mon Jul 04, 2011 7:55 am

the sensor is probably not defective. it is probably just doing its job telling you there is no air flowing. is there an induced draft motor that is not running? if it is running, there may be a nest or some other obstruction inhibiting air flow. when you jumper the sensor and the valve ignites, you are temporarily jumpering a safety switch....for testing only. don't leave it that way.
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- Pool Heater

Postby poolguy » Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:44 am

There is a induced fan motor, but it definitely is running (I can see it and hear it when the unit gets the signal to heat). Doesn't look like there is a nest, the fan sits by itself on "shelf" above the heat exchanger, does the unit need to have a good seal in order for the fan to work properly? I guess I can look in the fan itself for a nest. When I took the front plate of the unit off, I noticed a foam gasket the looked a little tore up.
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Postby nomadpeo » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:50 pm

if the gasket between the unit and the housing of the induced draft blower is defective or the screws holding it are loose, that could be the problem. a negative pressure in the housing provides the vacuum necessary to make the proving switch in question. an obstruction on the discharge side or a leak on the intake side will prevent the switch from making. if vanes are missing on the little blower wheel in there, that can also do it. the idea is to prove air is flowing through the combustion chamber before the gas valve circuit can be energized. the pressure switch is in series with the gas valve circuit.

inspect the wheel and verify the seal is tight. there is a remote possibility the switch could be defective. there should be a hose connected to the switch diaphragm housing. the other end is connected to the induced draft assembly housing. suck on it like a straw and the switch should make, causing the gas valve circuit to make. if it doesn't, the switch may be bad. if you have an ohmmeter, you can remove the switch from the circuit and test continuity.
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