partial installation needs completion

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partial installation needs completion

Postby gccch » Mon Apr 16, 2012 4:15 pm

Hello,

I'm a DIYer. I have a new home which has four zones. Two are installed and running. The other two have all the interior systems installed with the outdoor condensing unit plumbed and wired to the outside of the home but no units are present. It was never installed - to save the prior owner some up front costs, I suppose.

My question is, if I purchase the proper outdoor hardware, is it just a matter of soldering the unit in place? Is all the refrigerant contained in that unit? Or do I need to completely vacuum the entire system before inserting refrigerant? This I would not attempt.

I think I know the answer but please advise what I may be able to try and what to look out for.

Thanks,
gccch
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Postby heatseeker » Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:25 am

what type of units are they? minisplits or central? In either case r-22 not charged r-410a charged. Also not a diy project if you are looking for legit warranties and workmanship.
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- partial installation needs completion

Postby gccch » Tue Apr 17, 2012 10:55 am

They are central units. R-410a are installed on the other two zones. Goodman model GSX130181BA.

So do I need to vacuum the tubing going into the house?
gccch
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Postby Freon » Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:10 pm

First, research how to braze a connection. Solder usually won't hold at the condenser due to heat and vibration. Next, check if you can buy a condenser unit charged with r410. I know unless you're EPA licensed, you can't buy an R22 condenser that's charged. They do sell R22 condensers that are dry (EPA law) but you'll need R22 eventually and an EPA license. Check the indoor coil to see what type of refrigerant it likes before buying the condenser.

You'll also need a vacuum pump and pressure gauge that measures to microns of pressure... not cheap. Add liquid nitrogen to pressure test the system and the learning curve of time and you may find it's far more cost effective to have an HVAC company install the condenser units especially since you're doing 2 units. Price the condensers online so you have an idea of what the materials for the job should cost. Size them according to the indoor evaporator coils. It will probably take 2 men 1/2 day to do the install. And check the installing company's warranty for their installation work. You might also want to add a sight glass (about $10.) so you can check the refrigerant level.
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Postby gccch » Tue Apr 17, 2012 2:32 pm

Thank you for the excellent advice. I think this is a job for the pro. It's pretty safe the system is the same as the other two but larger sized. The inside units are all the same and installed at the same time. I have a local dealer already identified and will have them come by for an estimate.

Thanks again.
gccch
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Postby heatseeker » Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:17 pm

Did the duffus who left the unit uninstalled seal the tubing so air and moisture and bugs could not make it in there?
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Postby heatseeker » Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:19 pm

Freon -
> First, research how to braze a connection. Solder usually won't hold at the
> condenser due to heat and vibration. Next, check if you can buy a condenser
> unit charged with r410. I know unless you're EPA licensed, you can't buy an
> R22 condenser that's charged. They do sell R22 condensers that are dry (EPA
> law) but you'll need R22 eventually and an EPA license. Check the indoor
> coil to see what type of refrigerant it likes before buying the condenser.
>
> You'll also need a vacuum pump and pressure gauge that measures to microns
> of pressure... not cheap. Add liquid nitrogen to pressure test the system
> and the learning curve of time and you may find it's far more cost
> effective to have an HVAC company install the condenser units especially
> since you're doing 2 units. Price the condensers online so you have an idea
> of what the materials for the job should cost. Size them according to the
> indoor evaporator coils. It will probably take 2 men 1/2 day to do the
> install. And check the installing company's warranty for their installation
> work. You might also want to add a sight glass (about $10.) so you can
> check the refrigerant level.
Too much info for your typical diyer could end up hurting themselves. JMO.
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